Review + Author Q&A: “In Another Life” by C.C. Hunter

In Another Life_COVER.jpgTitle: In Another Life
Author: C.C. Hunter
Publisher: Wednesday Books
Publication Date: March 26, 2019
Rating: ⭐⭐⭐ 1/2
TW: Depression, mentions of suicide, child abuse, bullying, cheating, slut shaming
Get it: IndieBound | Book Depository | Barnes and Noble | Amazon | Kobo | iBooks

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39863498-the-gilded-wolves

ARC provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest opinion. Thank you goes out to Wednesday Books for inviting me to be part of the In Another Life blog tour.

 

What would you do if you found out that your life was based on a lie? This is the question C.C. Hunter asks as she tackles identity and family in in her newest title In Another Life.

Chloe was three years when she became Chloe Holden, but her adoption didn’t scar her, and she’s had a great life. Now, fourteen years later, her loving parents’ marriage has fallen apart and her mom moved them to Joyful, Texas. Starting twelfth grade as the new kid at school, everything Chloe loved about her life id gone. And feelings of déjà vu from her early childhood starts haunting her.

When Chloe meets Cash Colton she feels drawn to him, as though they’re kindred spirits. Until Cash tells her the real reason he sought her out. Chloe looks exactly like the daughter his foster parents lost years ago, and he’s determined to figure out the truth.

As Chloe and Cash delve into her adoption, the more things don’t add up, and the more strange things start happening. Why is Chloe’s adoption a secret that people would kill for?

It’s been a while since the last time I read a YA suspense so I was pretty excited to start on this book. With an intriguing blurb, In Another Life was a promising read and I jumped in expecting a thriller of a ride.

And I got that, but I could have done with more.

Marketed as a suspense thriller, In Another Life offered an interesting though formulaic puzzle. You’ll easily be able to put two and two together and figure out the mystery early on if you’ve read your own share of the genre before. I think it only took me about 20% of the book to suss out the whole plot of this story.

Predictability aside, I still enjoyed this book. In Another Life compensated in other areas. I like how it showed the mess and hurt a divorce brings a family, and the questions about identity it posed. It also didn’t hurt that both Chloe and Cash were so easy to root for. They are kindred spirits, both with their own baggage and, as Chloe puts it, “holes in their hearts.” Their romance, though it moved fast at whiplash speed at first, eventually grew on me.

Overall, In Another Life was a satisfying fast-paced read. I found the story engaging and enjoyable despite its flaws. However, I think this one would appeal more to YA contemporary readers rather than its intended audience.

Author Q&A (1)

I was lucky to have a chance to ask C.C. Hunter about her new book In Another Life. Read on to find out what inspired the story and how exactly a green-eyed mystery guy fit into Chloe’s search for identity.

What’s the story behind In Another Life? Where did you take inspiration from to write Chloe’s story?

The story of being adopted is one that I was intrigued with when I was young. I am, and have always been, different from my family. Not so much in appearance, but in interests and outlook. My two brothers and parents are people who like to work with their hands, who seldom slow down. They play sports, do crafts, and build houses. Me, I’m a thinker. Being dyslexic, I wasn’t a reader growing up, but I was writing books in my head by the time I was eleven.  Because of those differences in myself and my family, several of my stories included discovering that I was adopted. Every book I write has a little of the theme, Who am I? or Who am I now?  I love identity crisis books.  Also, my parents went through a bitter divorce when I was sixteen.  That pain Chloe felt was part of my teenage years.

How do you think the relationship between Cash and Chloe affect her search for the truth about her origins?

I like this question.  I think the relationship affects the search in many ways.  1.  There are times that falling in love became so consuming that I think the search became less consuming.  I wanted to show how great falling in love feels and how the wonderment of it can help soothe the bad things that come our way.  2. While their relationship brought them close. I wanted to showcase their different past experiences and how it affected how they each thought the search should proceed.  Cash felt more loyalty to the Fullers, and naturally, Chloe felt more toward the mom and dad who raised her.  3. I also wanted show that while the bond Chloe and Cash formed was solid, it was tested because of their different backgrounds.  Cash was willing to steal the information from the adoption agency, Chloe wanted no part of it.

I ask each author I interview to do this (so I hope you don’t find it weird) but can you summarize In Another Life using 3-5 emojis?

I would say the emojis would be, chew on your lip suspenseful, love, and either happiness or family.

Image result for emoji chewing on lip     Image result for valentine's day emojis free    happy

Author Q&A (2)

CC Hunter_Author Photo

C.C. HUNTER is a pseudonym for award-winning romance author Christie Craig. She lives in Tomball, Texas where she’s at work on her next novel.

Christie’s books include The Mortician’s Daughter series, Shadow Fall novels and This Heart of Mine.

Website | Twitter | Facebook

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Review: “The Last Romantics” by Tara Conklin

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Title: The Last Romantics
Author: Tara Conklin
Publisher: William Morrow
Publication Date: February 5, 2019
Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐
IndieBound | Book Depository | Barnes and Noble | Amazon | Kobo | iBooks

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39863498-the-gilded-wolves

ARC provided by the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest opinion.

 

Poetic and at moments heartbreaking, Tara Conklin’s sophomore offering tackles the love between siblings in The Last Romantics.

When the renowned poet Fiona Skinner is asked about the inspiration behind her iconic work, The Love Poem, she tells her audience a story about her family and a betrayal that reverberates through time.

It begins in a big yellow house with a funeral, an iron poker, and a brief variation forever known as the Pause: a free and feral summer in a middle-class Connecticut town. Caught between the predictable life they once led and an uncertain future that stretches before them, the Skinner siblings—fierce Renee, sensitive Caroline, golden boy Joe and watchful Fiona—emerge from the Pause staunchly loyal and deeply connected. Two decades later, the siblings find themselves once again confronted with a family crisis that tests the strength of these bonds and forces them to question the life choices they’ve made and ask what, exactly, they will do for love.

I’m not much for family sagas. Truthfully, I try to avoid them as much as possible because they either (a) bore me, or (b) too complicated to be believable. Most of the time, it’s a combination of the two for me. So I don’t know why I picked this book up, but whatever it was, I’m glad it made me click on that request button.

The Last Romantics was an emotional read – heartbreaking and illuminating both at the same time. It’s a story that tackles love, not the romantic kind despite the title, but the one shared between siblings.

Told from the point of view of poet Fiona Skinner, The Last Romantics follows the Skinner siblings: Renee, Caroline, Joe and Fiona. The lives of the four children drastically changes when their father suffers a heart attack, falling dead on the floor of his dental clinic in the summer of 1981. This one incident will ripple throughout their lives, changing each young child and affecting the adults they eventually will become.

The Last Romantics was a well-written, evocative story, and I enjoyed reading it. Sure, there were parts of it that felt off, things that didn’t make much sense: Fiona somehow knowing and then narrating her sisters’ and brother’s thoughts, ones they didn’t share with her; the use of the never-explained, partially-integrated future world devastated by climate change which, in hindsight, felt more and more like a ploy to explain Fiona’s longevity. Normally, these illogical bits would have been enough for me to put down any book, but what made me stuck through with this one were the characters.

Conklin drew completely realized characters, fleshed out and realistic, starting from her main character Fiona right down to the supporting casts. You can just imagine the other Skinner siblings doing their own stuff, living their own lives even if they aren’t on the page with Fiona, and that is a feat to pull off.

Great characters and writing aside though, what I loved the most about this book is how it explored sibling relationships. This book is so full of emotions, all throughout the story you’ll read about the ups and downs of the Skinner sibings much like how it is in real life. It was realistic how Conklin portrayed the siblings’ relationship, developing it and letting it evolved as the four Skinners grow older.

The Last Romantics made me think about my own siblings and there were definitely times when I saw a bit of myself in the characters. Much as I loved all of the characters though, I think I’m most partial to Renee probably because we’re both firstborns and we kind of have to grow up faster than our peers.

Overall, The Last Romantics was a terrific contemporary family drama. It was a beautiful exploration of the strong connections between siblings, and just how much each could and would do for one another. I definitely recommend this to contemporary lovers who love a heavy dosing of drama in their reading.

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About the Author:

Tara ConklinTARA CONKLIN was born on St. Croix in the US Virgin Islands and raised in Stockbridge, Massachussetts. She is a graduate of Yale University, the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, and New York University School of Law. A joint US-UK citizen, Tara now lives in Seattle. Her first novel, The House Girl, was a NYT bestseller, #1 IndieNext pick and Target book club pick.

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram

Book Spotlight: “Sky Without Stars” by Jessica Brody & Joanne Rendell

Today is my tour stop for the FFBC Sky Without Stars blog tour, and I’m so excited to be featuring some really cool stuff for it.

Sky Without Stars (Jessica Brody  & Joanne Rendell)
Title: Sky Without Stars
Series: System Divine #1
Authors: Jessica Brody and Joanne Rendell
Publisher: Simon Pulse
Publication Date: March 26, 2019
Pre-order: IndieBound | Book Depository | Barnes and Noble | Amazon | KoboKobo | iBooks

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39863498-the-gilded-wolves

A thief. An officer. A guardian.

Three strangers, one shared destiny…

When the Last Days came, the planet of Laterre promised hope. A new life for a wealthy French family and their descendants. But five hundred years later, it’s now a place where an extravagant elite class reigns supreme; where the clouds hide the stars and the poor starve in the streets; where a rebel group, long thought dead, is resurfacing.

Whispers of revolution have begun – a revolution that hinges on three unlikely heroes…

Chatine is a street-savvy thief who will do anything to escape the brutal Regime, including spy on Marcellus, the grandson of the most powerful man on the planet.

Marcellus is an officer – and the on of a renowned traitor. In training to take command of the military, Marcellus begins to doubt the government he’s vowed to serve when his father dies and leaves behind a cryptic message that only one person can read: a girl named Aloutte.

Aloutte is living in an underground refuge, where she guards and protects the last surviving library on the planet. But a shocking murder will bring Aloutte to the surface for the first time in twelve years and plunge Laterre into chaos.

All three have a role to play in a dangerous game of revolution – and together they will shape the future of a planet.

Power, romance, and destiny collide in this sweeping reimagining of Victor Hugo’s masterpiece, Les Misérables.

Sky Without Stars releases tomorrow and, if you love Les Misérables with a bit of a space opera spin to it, then you’ll love this. Today is actually the last day to pre-order your copy and enter to get some awesome book swag – an autographed bookplate, Sky Without Stars bookmark and postcard. Plus if you order from one of the indie bookstores listed here you’ll get a LIMITED EDITION full-color poster map of Laterre that won’t be available anywhere else.

Pre-order Swag | Sky Without Stars

Another plus, all pre-orders are guaranteed to get one of two secret covers that will only be available on the book’s first printing.

pre_order_sky_hidden_covers

And to get you even more excited (and ready) for tomorrow’s release, here’s an excerpt from Sky Without Stars. This one is from Chatine’s POV, our feisty and crafty thief whose destiny will change Laterre.

Excerpt | Sky Without Stars (Jessica Brody & Joanne Rendell)

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About the Authors:

Jessica Brody

JESSICA BRODY is the author of more than 15 books for teens, tweens, and adult including Addie Bell’s Shortcut to Growing Up, A Week of Mondays, Boys of Summer, 52 Reasons to Hate My Father, and the three books in the sci-fi Unremembered trilogy. She’s also the author of the Descendants: School of Secrets series, based on the hit Disney Channel original movie, Descendants. Her books have been translated and published in over 23 countries and Unremembered and 52 Reasons to Hate My Father are currently in development as major motion pictures. She lives with her husband and four dogs, and splits her time between California and Colorado.

Website  | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram

Joanne RendellJOANNE RENDELL is the author of three novels and holds a PhD in English literature. She teaches fiction writing to teens and kids, and is a board member for the youth Shakespeare company, New Genesis Productions. With her husband and son, Joanne divides her time between New York City, and New Paltz, New York.

Website | Twitter | Instagram

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GIVEAWAY!

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Win a copy of Sky Without Stars by Jessica Brody and Joanne Rendell. US only. Giveaway ends April 2.

Good luck!

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March 20th

The Unofficial Addiction Book Fan Club – Interview with Joanne Rendell

 

March 21st

NovelKnight – Guest Post
Andi’s ABCs – Book Spotlight
L.M. Durand – Review
Book Beach Bunny – Review + Dream Cast
That Artsy Reader Girl – Interview with Jessica Brody

March 22nd

BookCrushin – Guest Post
Hauntedbybooks – Review + Favourite Quotes
Dazzled by Books – Review + Favourite Quotes
The Mind of a Book Dragon – Review + Playlist

March 23rd

Wishful Endings – Interview
Moonlight Rendezvous – Review + Favourite Quotes

March 24th

Confessions of a YA Reader – Promotional Post

March 25th

Camillea Reads – Review + Favourite Quotes

March 26th

Book Slaying – Interview
In Between Book Pages – Review + Favourite Quotes

First Line Fridays: “Sky Without Stars” by Jessica Brody & Joanne Rendell

First Line Fridays (feature photo)

First Line Fridays is a weekly feature hosted by Hording Books.


Happy Friday!

Look who’s back from an unplanned blogging hiatus. Me! Well, truthfully I’m still in the middle of a week-long vacation with my family. We’re visiting my mom’s family in her home province in the far north.

I love it here! It’s so peaceful and quiet, a far cry from life in the city. I took the liberty to use my time here (or at least the time I’m not going from one uncle/aunt’s home pigging out on fresh fruit and sticky rice cakes) to catch up on my ARCs. I’ll be featuring the one I am currently reading for this week’s FLF.

Sky Without Stars (Jessica Brody  & Joanne Rendell)

 

CHATINE

The rain was falling sideways in the Marsh. It was never a straight downpour. It was always crooked. Just like the people here. Con artists and hustlers and crocs, the lot of them.

Anyone can be saint until they’re hungry.

 

 

I’m only 20% into Sky Without Stars and, right now, I feel like I’m just starting to get to know the main characters. I don’t know what to make of it yet, though this one is being marketed as a Les Misarables re-telling. I guess we’ll see, right?

Sky Without Stars is set to be released next Tuesday, March 26.

💗💗💗

Rachel

let's chat

Come and join in the fun. Visit Hoarding Books to see what other FLF bloggers has to share.

Review: “The Fever King” by Victoria Lee

39897058Title: The Fever King
Series: Feverwake #1
Author: Victoria Lee
Publisher: Skyscape
Publication Date: March 1, 2019
Rating: ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐⭐
TW: Drug & alcohol abuse, violence, torture, genocide, mental health, parental death, death of child death
Get it: IndieBound | Book Depository | Barnes and Noble | Amazon

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39863498-the-gilded-wolves

 

 

Debut author Victoria Lee mixes science fiction and fantasy to create an intriguing new world in her series opener The Fever King.

In the former United States, sixteen-year-old Noam Álvaro wakes up in a hospital bed, the sole survivor of the viral magic that killed his family and made him a technopath. His ability to control technology attracts the attention of the minister of defense and thrusts him into the magical elite of the nation of Carolinia.

The son of undocumented immigrants, Noam has spent his life fighting for the rights of refugees fleeing magical outbreaks—refugees Carolinia routinely deports with vicious efficiency. Sensing a way to make change, Noam accepts the minister’s offer to teach him the science behind his magic, secretly planning to use it against the government. But then he meets the minister’s son—cruel, dangerous, and achingly beautiful—and the way forward becomes less clear.

Caught between his purpose and his heart, Noam must decide who he can trust and how far he’s willing to go in pursuit of the greater good.

The Fever King is one of my most anticipated releases of this year. I’ve read a lot of good things about it from other bloggers who had the chance to read it in advance, and it made me just want to get my grabby, impatient hands on it. Needless to say, I pre-ordered my copy early (because I am weak!)

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This book deserved all the buzz it got!

I started reading it immediately soon as I got it on my Kindle and finished it almost in one sitting. Fast-paced and gripping, the story pulled me in and plunged me into this intriguing post apocalyptic world where magic runs rampant. I loved everything about this story – characters, plot, the topics it tackled without reservation, the diversity contained within its pages. The Fever King is easily one of the best books I’ve read so far this year.

Noam as a main character was so easy to love. He had a rough life, the son of undocumented immigrants fleeing magic-infested Atlantia, Carolinia’s neighboring country. After his mother’s death, Noam had to take care of his father who, in his grief, falls deep into depression.

But even his father is taken from him when viral magic hits his neighborhood killing everyone except Noam.

Noam is a complex character. Fierce and good-intentioned, though a little misguided and naive. His story reflects that of many migrants especially in the US. Being part of both worlds, I think he felt guilty, unnecessary but nevertheless there, and it drove him to strive to change things for the Atlantia refugees crossing lines and doing things he never thought he would do in the process. 

TFK 1.png

It was a ride reading and tracking his journey knowing that some of the people he has surrounded himself with have hidden agendas. You don’t know how many times I wanted to reach out into the book, grab Noam by his shoulders and shake some sense into him. Frustrating as it was for me as reader, I think Noam’s naivety and moral grayness made him more believable and realistic – more human – and it’s what endeared him more to me.

The Fever King tackles some pretty heavy stuff. Immigration and intergenerational trauma are just two of the most prevalent ones. Victoria Lee pulls no punches and weaves these topics into her narrative. But if you’re worried it will be too message-y, then fret not because it isn’t at all. This partly owes it to Lee’s seamless work, but mostly it’s because, I think, she really meant for this book to have half of its foundations built on politics. It’s one of the things I appreciate the most about this story.

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As if it I need more reasons to love this book, The Fever King also features a diverse cast of characters. Noam is bisexual and Jewish. His father, while not directly stated in the book (I think, so correct me if I’m wrong) is Columbian. He converts into Judaism when he married Noam’s mother.

Dara, beautiful and mysterious Dara who had me trying to puzzle him out until the very end of this installment, is so unashamedly gay. He and Noam have this instant connection, tense at first then developing into something genuine towards the end.

TFK 2.png

Like Noam, Dara has been through some tough times. Some of it were alluded to in the book, but I could do with more. And maybe we’ll get that in the next book, but in this one I feel like I only half know him. The same goes for Calix Lehrer, the antagonist and Noam’s and Dara’s mentor.

Overall, The Fever King is an awesome book and a great series opener. Taking elements from both genres, it creates an intriguing balance between sci-fi and fantasy. I am totally in for this series and excited for the next book already. Let’s just hope my brain stops thinking about what might happen to Dara and how Noam’s going to play Lehrer’s game. I absolutely recommend this if you’re into sci-fi and fantasy with a generous peppering of political intrigue and manipulation.

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About the Author:

Victoria LeeVICTORIA LEE grew up in Durham, North Carolina, where she spent twelve ascetic years as a vegetarian before discovering that spicy chicken wings are, in fact, a delicacy. She’s been a state finalist competitive pianist, a hitchhiker, a pizza connoisseur, an EMT, an expat in China and Sweden, and a science doctoral student. She’s also a bit of a snob about fancy whiskey.

Lee writes early in the morning and then spends the rest of the day trying to impress her border collie puppy and make her experiments work. She currently lives in PA with her partner.

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram

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GIVEAWAY!

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Win a copy of The Fever King by Victoria Lee. US only. Giveaway ends February 31.

Good luck!

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March 18th

March 19th

Moonlight Rendezvous – Review + Favourite Quotes
Morgan Vega – Review + Favourite Quotes
Novelishly – Review + Favourite Quotes
The Layaway Dragon – Review

March 20th

Utopia State of Mind – Guest Post
Phannie the ginger bookworm – Review + Favourite Quotes
Pages Below the Vaulted Sky – Review + Favourite Quotes
A Dream Within A Dream – Promotional Post

March 21st

Living a Hundred Lives – Review + Mood Board
In Between Book Pages – Review + Favourite Quotes < === Hey, you’re here!  🙂
The Book Bratz – Review + Favourite Quotes

March 22nd

Magical Reads – Review + Favourite Quotes
Confessions of a YA Reader – Promotional Post

March 23rd

SepiaReads – Review

March 24th

The Bibliophagist – Interview
Pages and Pugs – Review
Bookish_Kali – Review
Rebecca’s Reviews – Review + Favourite Quotes

 

First Line Fridays: “The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girls” by Anissa Gray

First Line Fridays (feature photo)

First Line Fridays is a weekly feature hosted by Hording Books.


Happy Friday!

Today I’m going to be sharing to you the first couple of lines from my most recent read The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girls.

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Althea
You do a lot of thinking in jail. Especially when you’re locked in the box that’s your cell. Mine is about as big as the walk-in closet I had back at home, but in place of leather bags and slingbacks and racks of clothes, I’ve got bunk beds, a stainless-steel sink-and-toilet combo, and a compact, padlocked cabinet. The cabinet’s where you keep your valuables, like family pictures, commissary and letters, including the one from your daughter that’s not addressed to you. The letter that, truth be told, you just can’t bring yourself to read, so you’ve got it tucked inside the Bible that belonged to your dead mother.

I just finished this book a day ago and I’m still thinking about it. The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girls was an emotional read, and a great debut at that. But, having read this right after I finished Tara Conklin’s The Last Romantics, it kind of fell a bit flat to me. Don’t get me wrong, it was an exceptionally written novel, the problem’s on my end. I’d talk about this more in my review, which I’m hoping to get posted within next week.

The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girls releases next week, February 26.

Have a happy weekend!

💗💗💗

Rachel

let's chat

Come and join in the fun. Visit Hoarding Books to see what other FLF bloggers has to share.

Review: “You Asked for Perfect”‘ by Laura Silverman

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Title: You Asked for Perfect
Author: Laura Silverman
Publisher: Sourcebooks Fire
Publication Date: March 5, 2019
Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐
TW: Anxiety, recreational drug use
Get it: IndieBound | Book Depository | Barnes and Noble | Amazon

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39863498-the-gilded-wolves

ARC provided by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest opinion.

 

Utterly realistic and relatable, Laura Silverman tackles the pressures and difficulties teens face in their academic lives in her sophomore title You Asked for Perfect.

Senior Ariel Stone is the perfect college applicant: first chair violin, dedicated community volunteer, and expected valedictorian. He works hard – really hard – to make his life look effortless. A failed Calculus quiz is not part of that plan. Not when he’s number one. Not when his peers can smell weakness like a freshman’s body spray.

Figuring a few all-nighters will preserve his class rank, Ariel throws himself into studying. His friends will understand if he skips a few plans, and he can sleep when he graduates. Except Ariel’s grade continues to slide. Reluctantly, he gets a tutor. Amir and Ariel have never gotten along, but Amir excels in Calculus, and Ariel is out of options.

Ariel may not like Calc, but he might like Amir. Except adding a new relationship to his long list of commitments may just push him past his limit.

It’s been a handful of years now since I finished high school. I wasn’t an exceptional student, but I still remember most of it – the struggle to fit in, competing with your classmates, balancing acads with extra curriculars, the pressure of maintaining high grades and a high weighted average to get into a good university. High school was tough and I was only happy, probably too happy, when I finally walked off with my diploma.

I guess, that’s what I was expecting from You Asked for Perfect when I started reading it:  tackle high school life – the good, the bad and everything in between. And that was exactly what I got! A very likable set of diverse characters, an adorable M/M romance and a whole load of Harry Potter references, there’s just so much to love in this book.

Where was this book when I was in high school myself? 

You Asked for Perfect was a refreshing yet still realistic take on academic anxiety and how the demand and struggle for perfection negatively affects young people. Laura Silverman explored this topic with much care and sensitivity while keeping the story fun and quirky.

Ariel was such a relatable character. Anyone, doesn’t matter how young or not young, will surely see a little of themselves in him (as well as the rest of the characters.) Ariel was smart, talented and funny; self-conscious and highly critical of himself. Reading his story took me back to the past and brought forth into memory a younger version of myself and of coffee-fueled late nights studying for an exam, cramming my head with information.

That I reminisced about high school, a part of my academic life that I’d much rather forget, was a testament to how well and effective Silverman crafted her characters. She brought to life colorful characters, characters that you can imagine living their own stories separate from Ariel’s. Rasha, Malka, Sook, Amir and (my namesake) Rachel – I was invested in what will happen to them and how well they will fare. It was just so much easier to care about a character when you feel like you know them, and that can only happen if they were fully fleshed out.

The romance part of this book was also another thing I loved. Ariel and Amir were ultra cute! These two totally had me shipping them from the very first time they appeared on the same page. And it was so adorable, how they got together! But while Amir plays an important part in Ariel’s life, their relationship played out on the sidelines – a critical subplot there to support the main story – and I appreciate that Silverman remained true to the focus of her story.

There’s much, much more to love about You Asked for Perfect. Diversity and representation, for one, with all the mains and secondary characters coming from different cultural backgrounds and sexual orientations (Ariel, Amir, Rasha, Malka and Isaac are all Jewish, Pari is Muslim, and Sook is Korean. Ariel is bisexual, Amir gay and Sook, a lesbian)  and I’m a 100% down for it. I also love all of the parts involving the parents in this book. Supportive and still very human, very flawed parents – it’s something that I wouldn’t mind reading more in the future.

Overall, You Asked for Perfect is an honest and lighthearted YA contemporary. With a diverse cast of characters, adorable romance and a plot most would be able to relate to, this book is an awesome read. I definitely recommend it to anyone and everyone, but most especially to contemporary lovers. You’ll fall in love with this book!

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Here’s a bonus playlist for y’all, inspired by Ariel and his great musical taste + a few songs that, I think, fits Amir and Ariel!

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About the Author:

Laura SilvermanLAURA SILVERMAN is an author and editor and currently lives in Brooklyn, New York. She earned her MFA in Writing for Children at the New School. Her books include Girl Out of Water, You Asked for Perfect, and It’s a Whole Spiel. Girl Out of Water was a Junior Library Guild Selection.

Website | Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads

 

 

 

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GIVEAWAY!

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Win a copy of You Asked for Perfect by Laura Silverman. Open INTERNATIONALLY as long as Book Depository ships to your country. Giveaway ends February 24.

Good luck!

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FEBRUARY 11th

FEBRUARY 12th

The Book Raven – Review + Playlist

FEBRUARY 13th

Young Adult Media Consumer – Review + Favourite Quotes
Milky Way of Books – Review
The Bibliophagist – Review

FEBRUARY 14th

Vicarious Bookworm – Review + Playlist
Novel Ink – Review

FEBRUARY 15th

Literary Meanderings – Interview
Metamorphoreader – Review + Playlist
The Hermit Librarian – Review + Favourite Quotes
Reading With Wrin – Review

FEBRUARY 16th

The YA Obsessed – Review
The Layaway Dragon – Review + Favourite Quotes
Akithroughbooks – Review + Favourite Quotes
In Between Book Pages – Review + Playlist    < == You’re here! 😀 

FEBRUARY 17th

Vicky Who Reads – Review
A Bookish Dream  – Review

 

Can’t-Wait Wednesday: “The Fever King” by Victoria Lee

Can't Wait WednesdayCan’t-Wait Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted Tressa at Wishful Endings, to spotlight and discuss the books we’re excited about that we have yet to read. It’s based on Waiting on Wednesday, hosted Jill at Breaking the Spine.


Happy mid-week! Today for CWW I will be featuring one of the many books I’m looking forward to next month.

39897058Title: The Fever King
Series: Feverwake #1
Author: Victoria Lee
Publisher: Skyscape
Publication Date: March 1, 2019
Pre-order: IndieBound | Book Depository | Barnes and Noble | Amazon

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39863498-the-gilded-wolves

 

In the former United States, sixteen-year-old Noam Álvaro wakes up in a hospital bed, the sole survivor of the viral magic that killed his family and made him a technopath. His ability to control technology attracts the attention of the minister of defense and thrusts him into the magical elite of the nation of Carolinia.

The son of undocumented immigrants, Noam has spent his life fighting for the rights of refugees fleeing magical outbreaks—refugees Carolinia routinely deports with vicious efficiency. Sensing a way to make change, Noam accepts the minister’s offer to teach him the science behind his magic, secretly planning to use it against the government. But then he meets the minister’s son—cruel, dangerous, and achingly beautiful—and the way forward becomes less clear.

Caught between his purpose and his heart, Noam must decide who he can trust and how far he’s willing to go in pursuit of the greater good.

I’m pretty excited for this one, so excited that I pre-ordered it last December. It’s only a couple of weeks now ’til The Fever King‘s release and I’ve been hearing nothing but great things about it. I’m sure I’m going to be setting aside everything else once my copy arrives. Good luck trying to reach me while I read.

💗💗💗

Rachel

let's chat

What book/s are you excited for this week?

Music Monday: “Haunted House” by Florence + The Machine

Music Mondays

Music Mondays is a book meme where you share a song you really like. It is hosted by The Tattoed Book Geek.


Hey there! Happy Monday!

I’ve been quiet for most of last week, and may continue to do so in this week as I try to catch up with my reading and writing my blog posts. The last couple of months’ hectic run took a toll on both my reading and writing but since I am done with all the necessary annual reports I needed to submit, I am determined to get back on my usual program for the blog.

I have a couple of things I need to do for the blog – write reviews, work on a feature/discussion post I’ve been sitting on the last month or so, send requests for review copies. It’s all crazy, and I don’t know exactly how to start it, so if you could spare me some good luck I could really put it into good use.

I’ve been terribly outdated re: new music releases as well. Work does that to you. (I wish the younger Rachel, the one who wished she’d grow up faster so she could be an adult and do whatever the hell she wanted, could see present Rachel now.) I only found out that Florence + The Machine  released two new tracks the last month. And, of course, I’m in love with both her new songs. But somehow, with the jittery drums and piano added to Florence Welch’s beautiful vocals and haunting lyrics, I love Haunted House a little bit more. And that is the track I chose to share to you guys this Monday.

Here’s me wishing all of you a great week ahead.

💗💗💗

Rachel

let's chat

What are you listening to today?

 

First Line Fridays: “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before” by Jenny Han

First Line Fridays (feature photo)

First Line Fridays is a weekly feature hosted by Hording Books.


Hey! Congratulations! We’ve reached another Friday!

I actually debated whether or not I will be joining today’s FLF since this week has been a slow one for reading-wise. The good news is, I finally finished that damned annual health report and ready to submit it to HR, so they, in turn, could submit it to the Department of Labor and Employment. That out of the way, I’m expecting more reading time for myself. So, yay, for me! 😊

Today I’m going to be sharing the first couple of lines of a book I plan to read this month as part of the Year of the Asian Reading Challenge. If you haven’t yet, go check out Shealea’s post about it and sign up. There are very cute badges for every reading milestone. Plus, you get to immerse yourself into more Asian reads by Asian authors. Ain’t that fun?

15749186

 

 

Josh is Margot’s boyfriend, but you could say my whole family is a little in love with him. It’s hard to say who most of all. Before he was Margot’s boyfriend, he was just Josh. He was always there. I say always, but I guess that’s not true. He moved next door five years ago but it feels like always.

 

 

 

I’m embarrassed to admit this, but I haven’t read any of Jenny Han’s books even though one of my friends, Lhea, has been pushing me forever to get her titles (starting with Burn for Burn because she’s just so in-love with that series.) I got around to buying the whole To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before trilogy in 2017, and it has been languishing on my shelves since then. (I swear my pile of unread books curse me every time I come home with a paper bag from the bookstore.) But its Netflix movie adaptation, which I loved,  reminded me about these books so I’m doing myself service and am picking them up now (kinda fitting too since it’s February.)

Anyway, that’s it for me today. I swear I’ll be working on my blog extra hard in the next week or so to compensate for the lack of posts the last couple of months. Here’s me wishing all of you a great weekend ahead. May it be filled with equally great books that make your hearts happy.

💗💗💗

Rachel

let's chat

Come and join in the fun. Visit Hoarding Books to see what other FLF bloggers has to share.